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darreninfinity:

beavercop:

melleigh:

This machine allows anyone to work for minimum wage for as long as they like. Turning the crank on the side releases one penny every 4.97 seconds, for a total of $7.25 per hour. This corresponds to minimum wage for a person in New York. This piece is brilliant on multiple levels, particularly as social commentary. Without a doubt, most people who started operating the machine for fun would quickly grow disheartened and stop when realizing just how little they’re earning by turning this mindless crank. A person would then conceivably realize that this is what nearly two million people in the United States do every day…at much harder jobs than turning a crank. This turns the piece into a simple, yet effective argument for raising the minimum wage.

god damn

What a brilliant way to display this

(Source: bencrowther)

calming starter sentences

  • "Its okay, I'm here."

  • "I'm not going to leave you."

  • "Everything is okay."

  • "I'm going to protect you."

  • "I believe in you."

  • "Hear my heartbeat? Just focus on that."

  • "You'll be alright, no one can hurt you now."

  • "You're not going to lose me."

  • "I love you."

  • "I'll stay right here, okay?"

  • "Just breathe."

  • "I'm okay, you're okay, we're okay."

  • "You're everything to me."

  • "I don't care what they think, to me, you are perfect."

  • "Do you want to talk about it?"

  • "You don't have to be alone."

jazzforyourcow:

turbomun:

Gender dimorphism in animation at its finest.
In Frozen, we see three of the main human characters as children, then later as adults. This showcases a trend that isn’t new to animation but has been getting more and more obvious in recent years — namely, that female characters are given infantile faces on top of idealized adult bodies.
Look at Kristoff (sorry I couldn’t find a better picture of him, btw). There are numerous changes in his face between his child and adult designs, and yet enough similarities that you can tell it’s the same character at two different ages. The main difference is that his younger form is given more infantile features, such as larger eyes, a smaller nose, and a rounder face shape.
Then move down to Anna and Elsa. There’s no mistaking them for different characters at their different ages…but that’s because their child and adult designs are incredibly similar. Both ages show them with the same infantile features: large eyes, small nose, round face shape. It’s my understanding that these three people are only a few years apart in age; so why do Anna and Elsa look so much younger?
And if you’re about to say “NO, Anna and Elsa don’t have the same faces at both ages! There are slight differences in — ” then you’re missing the point. I didn’t say that Anna and Elsa’s faces don’t change, but the changes are very slight…especially compared to the major alterations that Kristoff’s design went through for his age progression.
Some might insist that it’s so Anna and Elsa are still recognizable. But again, how do you account for Kristoff being recognizable in both forms? Why do the female characters need to be treated differently than him?
Remember: Anna and Elsa are not real people, who through some random coincidence of biology happened to retain the same face as they got older. A large team of people had to design, revise, and approve them at both ages, and literally every facet of what these characters looked like was controllable.

[whispers] it’s because we infantalize women to give them less agency, but retain adult body shapes so they can be sexualized
jazzforyourcow:

turbomun:

Gender dimorphism in animation at its finest.
In Frozen, we see three of the main human characters as children, then later as adults. This showcases a trend that isn’t new to animation but has been getting more and more obvious in recent years — namely, that female characters are given infantile faces on top of idealized adult bodies.
Look at Kristoff (sorry I couldn’t find a better picture of him, btw). There are numerous changes in his face between his child and adult designs, and yet enough similarities that you can tell it’s the same character at two different ages. The main difference is that his younger form is given more infantile features, such as larger eyes, a smaller nose, and a rounder face shape.
Then move down to Anna and Elsa. There’s no mistaking them for different characters at their different ages…but that’s because their child and adult designs are incredibly similar. Both ages show them with the same infantile features: large eyes, small nose, round face shape. It’s my understanding that these three people are only a few years apart in age; so why do Anna and Elsa look so much younger?
And if you’re about to say “NO, Anna and Elsa don’t have the same faces at both ages! There are slight differences in — ” then you’re missing the point. I didn’t say that Anna and Elsa’s faces don’t change, but the changes are very slight…especially compared to the major alterations that Kristoff’s design went through for his age progression.
Some might insist that it’s so Anna and Elsa are still recognizable. But again, how do you account for Kristoff being recognizable in both forms? Why do the female characters need to be treated differently than him?
Remember: Anna and Elsa are not real people, who through some random coincidence of biology happened to retain the same face as they got older. A large team of people had to design, revise, and approve them at both ages, and literally every facet of what these characters looked like was controllable.

[whispers] it’s because we infantalize women to give them less agency, but retain adult body shapes so they can be sexualized
jazzforyourcow:

turbomun:

Gender dimorphism in animation at its finest.
In Frozen, we see three of the main human characters as children, then later as adults. This showcases a trend that isn’t new to animation but has been getting more and more obvious in recent years — namely, that female characters are given infantile faces on top of idealized adult bodies.
Look at Kristoff (sorry I couldn’t find a better picture of him, btw). There are numerous changes in his face between his child and adult designs, and yet enough similarities that you can tell it’s the same character at two different ages. The main difference is that his younger form is given more infantile features, such as larger eyes, a smaller nose, and a rounder face shape.
Then move down to Anna and Elsa. There’s no mistaking them for different characters at their different ages…but that’s because their child and adult designs are incredibly similar. Both ages show them with the same infantile features: large eyes, small nose, round face shape. It’s my understanding that these three people are only a few years apart in age; so why do Anna and Elsa look so much younger?
And if you’re about to say “NO, Anna and Elsa don’t have the same faces at both ages! There are slight differences in — ” then you’re missing the point. I didn’t say that Anna and Elsa’s faces don’t change, but the changes are very slight…especially compared to the major alterations that Kristoff’s design went through for his age progression.
Some might insist that it’s so Anna and Elsa are still recognizable. But again, how do you account for Kristoff being recognizable in both forms? Why do the female characters need to be treated differently than him?
Remember: Anna and Elsa are not real people, who through some random coincidence of biology happened to retain the same face as they got older. A large team of people had to design, revise, and approve them at both ages, and literally every facet of what these characters looked like was controllable.

[whispers] it’s because we infantalize women to give them less agency, but retain adult body shapes so they can be sexualized
jazzforyourcow:

turbomun:

Gender dimorphism in animation at its finest.
In Frozen, we see three of the main human characters as children, then later as adults. This showcases a trend that isn’t new to animation but has been getting more and more obvious in recent years — namely, that female characters are given infantile faces on top of idealized adult bodies.
Look at Kristoff (sorry I couldn’t find a better picture of him, btw). There are numerous changes in his face between his child and adult designs, and yet enough similarities that you can tell it’s the same character at two different ages. The main difference is that his younger form is given more infantile features, such as larger eyes, a smaller nose, and a rounder face shape.
Then move down to Anna and Elsa. There’s no mistaking them for different characters at their different ages…but that’s because their child and adult designs are incredibly similar. Both ages show them with the same infantile features: large eyes, small nose, round face shape. It’s my understanding that these three people are only a few years apart in age; so why do Anna and Elsa look so much younger?
And if you’re about to say “NO, Anna and Elsa don’t have the same faces at both ages! There are slight differences in — ” then you’re missing the point. I didn’t say that Anna and Elsa’s faces don’t change, but the changes are very slight…especially compared to the major alterations that Kristoff’s design went through for his age progression.
Some might insist that it’s so Anna and Elsa are still recognizable. But again, how do you account for Kristoff being recognizable in both forms? Why do the female characters need to be treated differently than him?
Remember: Anna and Elsa are not real people, who through some random coincidence of biology happened to retain the same face as they got older. A large team of people had to design, revise, and approve them at both ages, and literally every facet of what these characters looked like was controllable.

[whispers] it’s because we infantalize women to give them less agency, but retain adult body shapes so they can be sexualized
jazzforyourcow:

turbomun:

Gender dimorphism in animation at its finest.
In Frozen, we see three of the main human characters as children, then later as adults. This showcases a trend that isn’t new to animation but has been getting more and more obvious in recent years — namely, that female characters are given infantile faces on top of idealized adult bodies.
Look at Kristoff (sorry I couldn’t find a better picture of him, btw). There are numerous changes in his face between his child and adult designs, and yet enough similarities that you can tell it’s the same character at two different ages. The main difference is that his younger form is given more infantile features, such as larger eyes, a smaller nose, and a rounder face shape.
Then move down to Anna and Elsa. There’s no mistaking them for different characters at their different ages…but that’s because their child and adult designs are incredibly similar. Both ages show them with the same infantile features: large eyes, small nose, round face shape. It’s my understanding that these three people are only a few years apart in age; so why do Anna and Elsa look so much younger?
And if you’re about to say “NO, Anna and Elsa don’t have the same faces at both ages! There are slight differences in — ” then you’re missing the point. I didn’t say that Anna and Elsa’s faces don’t change, but the changes are very slight…especially compared to the major alterations that Kristoff’s design went through for his age progression.
Some might insist that it’s so Anna and Elsa are still recognizable. But again, how do you account for Kristoff being recognizable in both forms? Why do the female characters need to be treated differently than him?
Remember: Anna and Elsa are not real people, who through some random coincidence of biology happened to retain the same face as they got older. A large team of people had to design, revise, and approve them at both ages, and literally every facet of what these characters looked like was controllable.

[whispers] it’s because we infantalize women to give them less agency, but retain adult body shapes so they can be sexualized
jazzforyourcow:

turbomun:

Gender dimorphism in animation at its finest.
In Frozen, we see three of the main human characters as children, then later as adults. This showcases a trend that isn’t new to animation but has been getting more and more obvious in recent years — namely, that female characters are given infantile faces on top of idealized adult bodies.
Look at Kristoff (sorry I couldn’t find a better picture of him, btw). There are numerous changes in his face between his child and adult designs, and yet enough similarities that you can tell it’s the same character at two different ages. The main difference is that his younger form is given more infantile features, such as larger eyes, a smaller nose, and a rounder face shape.
Then move down to Anna and Elsa. There’s no mistaking them for different characters at their different ages…but that’s because their child and adult designs are incredibly similar. Both ages show them with the same infantile features: large eyes, small nose, round face shape. It’s my understanding that these three people are only a few years apart in age; so why do Anna and Elsa look so much younger?
And if you’re about to say “NO, Anna and Elsa don’t have the same faces at both ages! There are slight differences in — ” then you’re missing the point. I didn’t say that Anna and Elsa’s faces don’t change, but the changes are very slight…especially compared to the major alterations that Kristoff’s design went through for his age progression.
Some might insist that it’s so Anna and Elsa are still recognizable. But again, how do you account for Kristoff being recognizable in both forms? Why do the female characters need to be treated differently than him?
Remember: Anna and Elsa are not real people, who through some random coincidence of biology happened to retain the same face as they got older. A large team of people had to design, revise, and approve them at both ages, and literally every facet of what these characters looked like was controllable.

[whispers] it’s because we infantalize women to give them less agency, but retain adult body shapes so they can be sexualized

jazzforyourcow:

turbomun:

Gender dimorphism in animation at its finest.

In Frozen, we see three of the main human characters as children, then later as adults. This showcases a trend that isn’t new to animation but has been getting more and more obvious in recent years — namely, that female characters are given infantile faces on top of idealized adult bodies.

Look at Kristoff (sorry I couldn’t find a better picture of him, btw). There are numerous changes in his face between his child and adult designs, and yet enough similarities that you can tell it’s the same character at two different ages. The main difference is that his younger form is given more infantile features, such as larger eyes, a smaller nose, and a rounder face shape.

Then move down to Anna and Elsa. There’s no mistaking them for different characters at their different ages…but that’s because their child and adult designs are incredibly similar. Both ages show them with the same infantile features: large eyes, small nose, round face shape. It’s my understanding that these three people are only a few years apart in age; so why do Anna and Elsa look so much younger?

And if you’re about to say “NO, Anna and Elsa don’t have the same faces at both ages! There are slight differences in — ” then you’re missing the point. I didn’t say that Anna and Elsa’s faces don’t change, but the changes are very slight…especially compared to the major alterations that Kristoff’s design went through for his age progression.

Some might insist that it’s so Anna and Elsa are still recognizable. But again, how do you account for Kristoff being recognizable in both forms? Why do the female characters need to be treated differently than him?

Remember: Anna and Elsa are not real people, who through some random coincidence of biology happened to retain the same face as they got older. A large team of people had to design, revise, and approve them at both ages, and literally every facet of what these characters looked like was controllable.

[whispers] it’s because we infantalize women to give them less agency, but retain adult body shapes so they can be sexualized

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